Individual Notes

Note for:   Mary Ann Fields,   ABT 1826 -          Index

Individual Note:
     1851 Drennan roll: Delaware, 948 as Mary Jane Grimmit

Individual Notes

Note for:   Thomas Monroe Fields,   ABT 1828 -          Index

Individual Note:
     Starr's letter books: F358

Individual Notes

Note for:   George Grimmett,    -          Index

Individual Note:
     1851 Drennan Roll: Delaware, 948

Individual Notes

Note for:   George Washington Fields,   1 MAY 1838 - 20 OCT 1914         Index

Individual Note:
     1851 Drennan roll: Delaware, 135

Individual Notes

Note for:   Gahoka Mary Melvina Weir,    -          Index

Event:   
     Type:   Clan
     Place:   Long-Haired Clan (Mary Grant)

Individual Note:
     1851 Drennan roll: Delaware, 78

Individual Notes

Note for:   Isaac Scrimsher,   1823 -          Index

Individual Note:
     [James c buck beaver Jr tree. FTW]

Individual Notes

Note for:   George Fields,   ABT 1770 - 11 APR 1858         Index

Individual Note:
     George Fields was a captain of Cherokee auxiliaries to General Andrew Jackson's army in the Creek War of 1814.

Individual Notes

Note for:   John Fields,   ABT 1772 -          Index

Event:   
     Type:   Clan
     Place:   Long-Haired Clan

Event:   
     Type:   Note
     Date:   1804
     Place:   640 acres near New Madrid, MO


Individual Notes

Note for:   Turtle Fields,   ABT 1776 -          Index

Event:   
     Type:   Clan
     Place:   Long-Haired Clan

Individual Note:
     Turtle Fields served with the Cherokee allies of the American forces in the Creek War of 1814 and later became a Methodist minister.

Residence: 1822, Wills Town, AL
1835 Census roll: Will Valley, AL

[From James Hicks, E. Starr]

Individual Notes

Note for:   Lorenza Lowe Frazier,   11 JUL 1819 - 31 AUG 1890         Index

Alias:   Uncle /Dr./

Residence:   
     Date:   1880
     Place:   Lincoln, , Christian, Missouri,

Residence:   
     Date:   1850
     Place:   Porter, , Greene, Missouri,

Residence:   
     Date:   1870
     Place:   Polk, , Christian, Missouri,

Burial:   
     Place:   Frazier Cemetery

Individual Note:
     Lorenzo Lowe Frazier was born on July 11, 1819, in North Carolina, the son of John Frazier and Rebecca Lowe. He moved with his parents to Monroe County, Tennessee, and by 1836, the family had moved to McMinn County, Tennessee, near the city of Athens. On July 9, 1839, he was married to Hannah Bryant. In 1842, his older brother, Martin, received a land grant in Bradley County, Tennessee, near the city of Cleveland, and it was probably about this time that most of the Frazier family moved there.
Lorenzo served as a Private in Captain Cunningham's Company of the Tennessee Militia during the Seminole Indian War. The war lasted from 1835 to 1842, and after the Seminoles were subdued they were moved to the Oklahoma Territory.
    In 1848, Lorenzo and his family moved to Greene County, Missouri, where he received a land grant for his military service. The patent was issued on September 10, 1848, and was signed by Millard Fillmore, President of the United States. This tract of land became a part of Christian County, Missouri, in 1859. They continued to live here until their death. This tract of land begins a quarter mile east of the village of Boaz and extends for a mile down a beautiful valley that leads out to the James River. This grant of land remained continuously in the possession of members of the Frazier family for 105 years.
As a young boy in Tennessee, Lorenzo received a moderate education. When a young man he read medicine with a Dr. Clark in Tennessee, but followed agricultural pursuits until after he moved to Missouri. Their first year in Missouri the family rented property in Greene County, and then moved two miles west to the property Lorenzo received in the land grant. Their first home there was a rail pen with the wagon cover for a roof.
After he came to Missouri, Lorenzo gradually began to practice medicine and was a contemporary with Dr. E. T. Robertson. He served as a physician during the Civil War, and as the years passed became the leading physician of the entire region. He was well known and respected in Christian County and adjacent counties.
Lorenza was known in the community as "Uncle Dr. Frazier". Besides his farm and his medical practice, he maintained a store which was combination of drug store and general store. He obtained his drugs and the few staple articles for this frontier store by ox team from the mouth of the Linn Creek which was at the head of navigation on the Osage River, and is near where Bagnell Dam now is. Later when the railroad reached Rolla, Missouri, the goods came from Rolla by the same mode of transportation. Elisha Fraizer, Lorenza's son told his son D. S., that as a boy he would take a load of bacon from home to the lead mines at Granby in the extreme southwest corner of Missouri and exchange the bacon for lead which he then took to the mouth of Linn Creek and exchanged it for goods to be hauled back home for the store. This trip with a good ox team took not less than three weeks.
Early in the Civil War he became the First Lieutenant of a company of Home Guards. He commanded the company at the beginning of the Wilson Creek Battle. During this engagement his command was cut off, and he along with others retreated into Kansas for a brief period of time.
Formerly a Democrat in politics, Lorenzo later affiliated with the Republican party. Although frequently solicited to run for office, his devotion to his profession caused him to refuse. His career was always above reproach. From the age of 19, he was a devoted Methodist, but when he came to Missouri there was no Methodist organization in his area. He took it upon himself to erect a small church on his property and to engage a minister for it. About 1858, Lorenza gave 5 acres of land to be used as a site for a church and cemetery. Upon this site he and his neighbors built a log house which was used both as a church and as a school house. This building was later displaced by a small frame church known as Lorenza Chapel. In the year 1893, this building was replaced by a larger building which stood until about 1950. Regular services were held there for about 80 years. This is the church at which David Solomon Frazier, Lorenza's grandson, preached.
After the death of his wife, Hannah, Dr. Frazier remarried. His second wife was Cyntha Long Burchfield Thomas. Lorenzo, both of his wives and many of his descendants are buried at Frazier Cemetery in Christian County, Missouri.
Reference Sources: "A Reminiscent History of the Ozark Region"
        "Christian County, Missouri, History Book"
        "McMinn County, Tennessee, History Book"
        D. S. Frazier's Historical Sketch of the Fraziers

Individual Notes

Note for:   Hannah Bryant,   3 MAR 1821 - 24 DEC 1887         Index

Burial:   
     Place:   Frazier Cemetery

Individual Note:
     Hannah was a worthy member of the Methodist Church. Her father was a millwright by trade and followed that in Tennessee until his death. He was of English-German descent.
"A Reminiscent History of the Ozark Region".